Skip to main content

Pure Coolness

I have seen far from all the talks here, but from what I've seen and the buzz that I've heard the winner of the "coolest presentation award" was Manolis Kelaidis. He showed a paper e-book device that he's been prototyping. By means of conductive ink traces, a person touching a button on the page can trigger an action by an embedded processor.  He had a book where pads on the page triggered actions on his laptop: going to web pages, playing songs on iTunes, and so forth. 

It  was a hand-bound Bluetooth book!

There's clearly a huge expense still involved in platform building and so on, but everything he did is compatible with contemporary printing technology, using inks that are commercially available (not experimental). Other developments in printable circuitry play into this as well: printable batteries, printable electronic components,  printable speakers.

Of course this is a technology, not a solution, and there's a huge chain of associated requirements -- protocols for books to notify other devices; security regimes to define so that your new books won't hack your computer.  Based on experience in other media, conventions for authoring and use of the new technology are likely to be the most dificult adaptation.

But the great thing about paper is that you can write on it!

I immediately started thinking that this would be a great addition to a notebook. I'd buy a book with 10 generic buttons to a page, and any of them could be mapped to a function on my machine easily. So  I could take notes on something I was recording as audio or video and whack a button on the page to make a link. Or to record the page that I'm browsing right at this moment. 100 pages is 1,000 special buttons to memorize some data!

The other interesting thing is that you can make conductive traces by using a silver ink marking pen, so you could just draw buttons onto a page anywhere you want, connecting them to traces on the edge.

If the notebook shell had a slot for a memory and the processor, and a unique ID build in, you might be able to bring the hardware costs way down because you'd just have to clip the brain onto the book, and the brain would know what book it was connected to, so you could have fewer chunks of electronics.

Links to follow soon

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

2018 Tizra User Summit: What We Learned by Meeting Our Customers Where We Are

They say you should "meet your customers where they are." Well, for Tizra's 4th annual user conference we decided to take a chance and do the opposite. Instead of going to Chicago or DC, where Tizra customers are concentrated, we bet on hosting in our home town of Providence, RI. It's not that we don't love Chicago and DC, but we really felt we could do something special with the home field advantage. As it turns out, we were right.

The Tizra user community is a silo-busting mix of creatives, technologists, content strategists and executives, who share the goal of building, engaging and generating value from audiences with digital content. For this crowd, we didn't want a sterile conference facility. We felt that by giving them a place they could really connect with, we'd help them connect with each other. Providence, with its vibrant tech and design scene, walkable downtown, and non-traditional venues, provided just the funky catalyst we were looking fo…

Tizra's new Search is a CODiE Finalist

We're thrilled to announce that the new search feature we originally developed for the Einstein Papers Project has been named a finalist in the 2018 CODiE awards.  The CODiEs have been around for 30 years, and are the software and information industry's only peer-recognized awards program. It's wonderful to see all the hard work recognized in this way!
Just as exciting this powerful new content discovery tool is now available for use on all kinds of documents--from scholarly and professional to scientific and technical--through Tizra's new QuickStart option.  Learn more.



How Big Is the iPad Opportunity? Let's Look at the Stats

We recently took a closer look at the analytics for publications delivered through Tizra, and were not surprised to see that mobile usage continues to rise sharply. But what did surprise us was just how quickly one particular mobile device—the iPad—is driving a fundamental change in the way people consume content.

Apple's iOS mobile operating system is now second only to Windows in popularity, mostly because of the rapid rise in iPad use. Compared to a year ago, iPad traffic is up 277 percent, and now represents 21 percent of total user sessions on Tizra-powered sites.

It's hard to think of a better opportunity for publishers of eBooks and other long-form content.  If you'd like to know more about how publishers like the International Association for the Study of Pain, LAB-AIDS and others are working with Tizra, please drop us a line.